Saturday, May 23, 2015

Naked: C-String 'Bikini' Shows It Off! Video



You'll have to translate this one for yourself.
Or maybe the words don't matter to you at all.
Enjoy the warmer weather!

Ten Wealthiest US Towns, Wow! - Video

Christie: 'Misguided Ideologues' Zapped Patriot Act

Leadership Matters for America PAC, Inc. Honorary Chairman Governor Chris Christie released the statement below after the Senate failed to extend key provisions of the Patriot Act. 


"The Senate's failure to extend the Patriot Act is a failure of the US government to perform its most important function - protecting its citizens from harm. This is the unfortunate result of misguided ideologues who have no real world experience in fighting terrorism putting their uninformed beliefs above the safety and security of our citizens. This dysfunction is what we have come to expect from Washington, DC, but usually it does not have such dangerous and severe consequences."

Dan Cirucci Blog: All Time Top Ten Stories


Sorry if you can't see the photos on some of these
posts when you click on the link but photos are
often dropped by Blogger (a service of Google) for
no apparent reason.
We'll try to repost some in the future.
Thanks!

US, France, Germany, Ukraine Lead Blog Visits

Pageviews by Countries - Week of 5/17

Graph of most popular countries among blog viewers
EntryPageviews
United States
1596
France
948
Germany
321
Ukraine
148
Russia
145
South Korea
111
Ireland
102
Greece
43
Bulgaria
41
Thailand
29
Thank you for more than 3,500 Pageviews this week!

Dan Cirucci Blog: Week's Top Five Stories

For the week of May 17:

Friday, May 22, 2015

Washington? It's Wherever Hillary Is . . .



Campaigning in New Hampshire, Hillary insisted she was still in Washington.
Once she's out of the Beltway, she doesn't know where the hell she is!

Memorial Day: Surprising Facts You Need To Know!

Since the Memorial Day weekend is upon us, we hope you have a great time.
We also hope that you take time to remember those who have protected us and who have made (and continue to make) our freedom possible.
Now, let's get to the business at hand:
1) Not everyone will spend the long weekend at the Jersey shore. The media would have you believe that everyone is headed to the shore but that's just an easy way for the media to not report real stories over the weekend while at the same time nurturing the myth of the Great Shore Exodus. In fact, people enjoy the weekend in many different ways at many different places. We know we do -- and will.
2) Summer doesn't begin on Memorial Day. Summer begins on June 21, the summer solstice. And summer doesn't end on Labor Day. Summer ends on September 22 when autumn begins. The media and the travel industry concocted the idea that summer lasts from Memorial Day to Labor Day. It doesn't.
3) Memorial Day is actually May 30. Congress changed the day around to make it a three-day weekend in another attempt to rob a fine holiday of its true meaning. Leave it to the government to mess things up.
4) Memorial Day didn't become Memorial Day until 1966 when President Johnson officially renamed it. Prior to that it was widely known as Decoration Day - the day when Americans decorated the graves of the fallen.
5) The artificial boundaries of Memorial Day and Labor Day mean absolutely nothing even though many people perceive these boundaries to coincide with the school year. Most children go to school well past Memorial Day. Many children (particularly in southern states) return to school well before Labor Day. Others return several days after Labor Day.
6) This year Memorial Day is as early as it can be and Labor Day is as late as it can be. So, the stretch between the two is longer than usual -- good news for vacation and travel vendors.
But, remember: Memorial Day isn't when people say it is. The summer hasn't begun - yet. It won't end on Labor Day. Many people will get through the whole summer without ever going to the Jersey shore. They will have a wonderful time nonetheless.
The Memorial Day and Labor Day boundaries are totally imaginary.
So, there you have it.
Enjoy what's left of spring.
Then, enjoy summer all the way through till September 22.
In fact, enjoy each day as a blessed gift. Savor every day, no matter the season.
Don't be cheated.

Impressionists Will Rule This Summer In Philly!

This summer, from June 24 through September 13, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will present a ground-breaking exhibition examining the early struggles and ultimate triumph of the artists who created the style known as Impressionism and the role that the great Parisian art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel played in their success. 

Discovering the Impressionists: Paul Durand-Ruel and the New Painting will include numerous masterpieces by leading figures of this movement such as Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Mary Cassatt. It will reunite for the first time key paintings that were shown in the earliest exhibitions devoted to the work of these artists. 

Many of these were organized by Durand-Ruel, who was an early champion of the Impressionists and worked tirelessly over the course of nearly a half century to create a robust market for Impressionism in France, Germany, England, and the United States, from the critical moment in the 1870s when the paintings of Manet, Monet, Renoir, and others were greeted with ridicule to the early 20th century when their artistic genius was fully recognized. Philadelphia will be the venue for this exhibition in the United States after its presentation at the National Gallery of Art in London and the Musée du Luxembourg in Paris.

Timothy Rub, The George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer, stated: “This landmark exhibition brings together a remarkable group of masterpieces from collections throughout the world with the goal of exploring a chapter in the history of art that still captures our imagination. It will tell a story that has yet be told, of an enterprising art dealer who believed in sustained the careers of many artists such as Monet, Renoir, and Pissarro, and helped them to achieve great renown. In the process, Durand-Ruel essentially created the modern art market. Many great Impressionist collections today, including those of the Musée d’Orsay and the National Gallery—our partners in the development of this exhibition—along with the Philadelphia Museum of Art, were formed with works that at one time passed through his hands.”

The exhibition will explore key moments in the history of the Durand-Ruel Gallery and will reassemble remarkable groups of paintings that he exhibited, ranging from Monet’s renowned series of Poplars to Renoir’s celebrated Dances. The range and quality of the paintings presented in this exhibition is a testament to the dealer’s deep personal relationships with his artists, his unwavering belief in contemporary painting, and his keen business acumen.

Paul Durand-Ruel’s eventful encounter with Impressionism began in London in 1871 when he was introduced to Monet and Pissarro. Durand-Ruel exhibited and acquired some of their works at that time and soon started buying Impressionist works on an unprecedented scale. Discovering the Impressionists will revisit the boldness of this moment, displaying several of these early purchases, including Monet’s views of London (Philadelphia Museum of Art and National Gallery, London), Pissarro’s The Avenue, Sydenham (National Gallery, London), Sisley’s The Bridge at Villeneuve-la-Garenne (Metropolitan Museum of Art), and Degas’ Dance Foyer at the Opera on the rue Le Peletier (Musée d’Orsay).

The exhibition will also reenact the dramatic moment when in 1872 Durand-Ruel purchased more than twenty-six paintings by Édouard Manet, a visionary acquisition that marked a turning point for the artist. Reunited from Manet’s studio at that time will be such major works as Moonlight on Boulogne Harbor (Musée d’Orsay), The Battle of the U.S.S. “Kearsarge” and the C.S.S. “Alabama” (Philadelphia Museum of Art), The Salmon (Shelburne Museum). They are presented along with Boy with Sword (Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Key paintings from the Second Impressionism exhibition, of 1876, will be reassembled to reveal how this show advanced the careers of the dealer’s artists and brought Durand-Ruel into close contact with others, including Berthe Morisot. Some of these pivotal works were noted in the press: Renoir’s Study, Torso, Effect of Sunlight (Musée d’Orsay) derided for its vision of “putrefying flesh”; Morisot’s Hanging the Laundry Out to Dry (National Gallery of Art, Washington) compared favorably to Manet but accused of being unfinished; and Sisley’s The Watering Place at Marly-le-Roi (National Gallery, London), embraced by critics as one of “the good ones.” Held at Durand Ruel’s gallery, the exhibition indelibly linked the dealer to these artists at a vitally important moment in their careers.

Discovering the Impressionists will also focus on the importance of solo exhibitions, a novel concept that Durand Ruel pioneered for his artists, most notably with Monet in 1883 and 1892. Demonstrating the impact of the 1883 exhibition will be La Pointe de la Hève, Sainte-Adresse (National Gallery, London) to Train in the Snow (Musée Marmottan), Les Galettes(private collection), and others. Of the 15 paintings of poplars that Monet famously exhibited in 1892, six major works will be reassembled from collections around the world to examine in depth the artist’s serial approach to this subject.

Another highlight will be a choice selection of works shown at a landmark exhibition at the Grafton Galleries in London that included more than 300 works by Renoir, Monet, Pissarro, and others, still the largest Impressionist exhibition ever. Among the works reassembled from this 1905 exhibition will be Manet’s Music in the Tuileries Garden (National Gallery, London),Monet’s Coal-Dockers (Musée d’Orsay), Pissarro’s Pont Boieldieu (Art Gallery of Ontario), and Degas’ Miss La La at the Cirque Fernado (National Gallery, London). Also included will be period photographs that convey the exhibition’s unrivaled scale and ambition, considered a triumph for the movement.

The exhibition will demonstrate Durand-Ruel’s pivotal role in the formation of collections in the United States where he opened new markets for the Impressionists. Works shown in the U.S. to great acclaim in 1886 include Degas’ The Ballet Class (Philadelphia Museum of Art), and Morisot’s Woman at Her Toilette (Art Institute of Chicago). Renoir’s three large-scale dance paintings will be shown, including Dance at Bougival (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) and Dance in the Countryand Dance in the City (Musée d’Orsay), as well as notable acquisitions from the gallery by American museums. Among them are Mary Cassatt’s The Child’s Bath (Art Institute of Chicago) and Sisley’s View at Saint-Mammès (Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh).

Nearly all of the exceptional works that will be on view were once part of the gallery stock of this enterprising dealer. In addition, part of his much-admired personal collection, housed in the family’s apartment in Paris, will be reassembled with portraits by Renoir, a Rodin marble, and a recreated salon door composed of still life and floral panels painted by Monet.

Jennifer Thompson, the Gloria and Jack Drosdick Associate Curator of European Painting and Sculpture before 1900 and the Rodin Museum, stated: “Durand-Ruel and the history of Impressionism are to a large degree inseparable. From brilliant landscapes to riveting portraits of French leisure, the exhibition will demonstrate his unceasing commitment to fostering an appreciation for the work of these artists.”

About Paul Durand-Ruel
In 1865 Paul Durand-Ruel (1831–1922) inherited a gallery founded by his parents. By the early 1870s, when he discovered the young artists who would become known as the Impressionists, he began to promote their work. His innovative strategies included acquiring the work of the artists he favored in depth; gaining exclusivity in selling their work by offering them monthly stipends; hosting monographic or single-artist exhibitions; and establishing branches in London, Brussels, and New York that drew him into contact with influential and daring collectors around the world. Between 1871 and 1922, Paul Durand-Ruel purchased around 12,000 pictures, including more than 1,000 Monets, approximately 1,500 Renoirs, more than 400 by Degas and as many Sisleys, about 800 Pissarros, close to 200 Manets and nearly 400 Cassatts. He was the single most powerful driving force making Impressionism a household name worldwide. “Without Durand, we would have died of hunger, all us Impressionists,” Monet said. When he was 88-years old, the dealer declared: “At last the Impressionist masters triumphed … My madness had been wisdom. To think that, had I passed away at sixty, I would have died debt-ridden and bankrupt, surrounded by a wealth of underrated treasures…”

Organizer
The exhibition is organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by the National Gallery, London, and by the Réunion des musées nationaux - Grand Palais in collaboration with the Musée d’Orsay, Paris. The Durand-Ruel Archives in Paris have generously provided research assistance.

Sponsors
The exhibition is organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by the National Gallery, London, and by the Réunion des musées nationaux - Grand Palais in collaboration with the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

The exhibition is made possible by The Women’s Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Robert Lehman Foundation, Christie’s, The Annenberg Endowment for Special Exhibitions, and The Harriet and Ronald Lassin Fund for Special Exhibitions. Additional generous support has been provided by Dennis Alter, Steve and Gretchen Burke, Maude de Schauensee, John and Gloria Drosdick, Lois G. and Julian A. Brodsky, Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Linck, Martha Hamilton Morris and I. Wistar Morris III, Mr. and Mrs. John M. Thalheimer, Barbara B. and Theodore R. Aronson, and Constance and Sankey Williams. The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Curators
Joseph J. Rishel, The Gisela and Dennis Alter Senior Curator of European Painting before 1900, and Senior Curator of the John G. Johnson Collection and the Rodin Museum; and Jennifer A. Thompson, The Gloria and Jack Drosdick Associate Curator of European Painting before 1900 and Sculpture and the Rodin Museum.

Location
Dorrance Special Exhibition Galleries, first floor

Organizer
The exhibition is organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by the National Gallery, London, and by the Réunion des musées nationaux - Grand Palais in collaboration with the Musée d’Orsay, Paris. The Durand-Ruel Archives in Paris have generously provided research assistance.

Sponsors
The exhibition is organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by the National Gallery, London, and by the Réunion des musées nationaux - Grand Palais in collaboration with the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

The exhibition is made possible by The Women’s Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Robert Lehman Foundation, Christie’s, The Annenberg Endowment for Special Exhibitions, and The Harriet and Ronald Lassin Fund for Special Exhibitions. Additional generous support has been provided by Dennis Alter, Steve and Gretchen Burke, Maude de Schauensee, John and Gloria Drosdick, Lois G. and Julian A. Brodsky, Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Linck, Martha Hamilton Morris and I. Wistar Morris III, Mr. and Mrs. John M. Thalheimer, Barbara B. and Theodore R. Aronson, and Constance and Sankey Williams. The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Curators
Joseph J. Rishel, The Gisela and Dennis Alter Senior Curator of European Painting before 1900, and Senior Curator of the John G. Johnson Collection and the Rodin Museum; and Jennifer A. Thompson, The Gloria and Jack Drosdick Associate Curator of European Painting before 1900 and Sculpture and the Rodin Museum.

Location
Dorrance Special Exhibition Galleries, first floor

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is Philadelphia's art museum. We are a landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Plane Dumps Sh-- All Over Gal's Party: Video

Kenney's Uber Lib Mean Streak A Philly Menace

The inimitable Christine Flowers writes cogently (and accurately!) about Philly Dem mayoral nominee Jim Kenney in today's Daily News:
Kenney is the kind of convert to progressive causes that makes your head spin, and that type of spinning often brings on nausea. I know that there are many in the media, progressives all, who are thrilled with the man's positions on the legalization of (some) drugs, on the figurative handcuffing of police and on turning everyone who opposes gay marriage into a conservative Christian version of an ISIS terrorist, but I am not one of them.
There is something upsetting about a man who, because a company's religious owner makes a public, constitutionally protected statement about the "arrogance" of those who support same-sex unions, wants to run that man's company out of town. A few years ago, when Chick-fil-A's president Dan Cathy said that he believes in the "biblical definition of the family unit," Kenney pandered to the masses and penned a public letter that told Cathy to hit the road, Jack(ass.) Of course, the erstwhile councilman had every right to express his opinion.
But there's that little, insignificant issue of religious freedom that Kenney overlooked. If a city bars you from doing business because you express a faith-based belief, you start getting entangled in the First Amendment. It's more than a little troubling when a public official can't figure that one out, particularly in the city where the Constitution was signed, for Chrissake.
Read more at:
http://www.philly.com/philly/columnists/20150522_We_ve_had_liberal_doses_of_Kenney_already.html#2moCdWDJVJ3EVib0.99

Let Reagan's Words Urge You Forward!


The cause is still there. Don't give up your ideals, don't compromise, don't turn to expediency, don't get cynical. . . . The cause will prevail because it is right."
-President Ronald Reagan

Hillary Favorable Rating Reaching New Lows!

It seems that Hillary Clinton's worst move was announcing that she is a candidate for president.
Ever since, her favorable poll ratings have been heading steadily downward.
Believe it or not, they are now at a seven-year low.
Yes, the Pew Research Center says that she has now crossed below the 50 percent mark this month and sits at 49 percent. The only time her ratings were lower (48 percent) was back in May 2008 when she was being pushed out of the presidential race by Barack Obama.
Hillary has fallen steadily from the 66 percent favorable rating she had as secretary of state in November 2009.
Not good for the "inevitable" nominee who expects to be elected simply for "symbolic" reasons.

Coming: The Story Behind The Impressionists!